Frequently Asked Questions

Navigating the complexities of an entire baseball organization can be daunting, especially for folks just starting out. All the members of the Reedville Board were there at one point. To help you out, an FAQ document has been created

If your question is not answered, feel free to contact a board member and they will work to get your question answered. As additional questions are raised, this document will be edited.

  1. My child plays soccer and likes running around. I am worried that he/she will get bored. Is baseball a good sport to play?
  2. I played Little League as a kid. What is JBO? How is it different than Little League?
  3. I am considering a local baseball club like Mound Time. How is Reedville different?
  4. Why is it called Reedville Baseball and not something like Century Youth Baseball?
  5. Does Reedville Baseball offer off-season camps/workouts?
  6. Are girls allowed to play baseball for Reedville?
  7. I live outside of the Century High School boundary. Can my child play for Reedville?
  8. My child has a good friend who plays for Liberty. Can he/she play for Liberty?
  9. My daughter can't decide between baseball or softball. Which one should she play?
  10. OK, my child wants to play! How much is registration? Where do I go to register?
  11. I have completed the registration process. What is the next step?
  12. What do my registration fees go towards?
  13. I just registered my child at the pee-wee/rookie level. What equipment do I need to buy and what is supplied? Where is a good place to buy gear?
  14. I am interested in coaching my child's team. Who shall I contact about coaching?
  15. I never played as a youth so I do not feel qualified to coach. How else can I get involved?
  16. Are the Reedville coaches required to submit a background check? Do they received any specialized (i.e., concussion) training?
  17. My third grader has never played baseball before and I heard there is a "tryout" process? Will he/she make a team? Should I even bother registering him/her?
  18. I have heard that baseball requires a significant amount of parent involvement. What involvement is expected?
  19. What is "Field Day?"
  20. If part of our registration fees go towards field maintenance, why do we have a Field Day?
  21. What is the Jamboree?
  22. Is the uniform supplied?
  23. It's raining. How do I find out if the game is cancelled?
  24. How are the rookie/pee-wee teams formed? When do I find out?
  25. Roughly, when does the season start and when does it end?
  26. My child plays another sport in the spring. Can he/she still play baseball?
  27. My child(ren) want(s) to play but the registration fees are too much given my income. Are scholarships available?

My child plays soccer and likes running around. I am worried that he/she will get bored. Is baseball a good sport to play?

A: Well, we here at Reedville Baseball may be a little biased but yes, it's a great sport to play! To be sure, soccer is a terrific entry level sport for young athletes. The ball is large and fairly soft, the teams are small (at an early age), the rules are few, and there is constant action. So what does baseball have to offer? For starters, it connects the past to the present. Many of us played the game, either casually or competitively, as a youth. Teaching your child how to "play catch" is a great way to bind generations together. Secondly, it teaches a variety of skills at a young age; hitting, throwing, footwork, catching, all of which can be useful in other sports. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, it is simply different than soccer. More and more common are all year "club" sports that tap into the minds of parents and convince them to sign their kids up for the same fall/spring/summer sport, even at a very young age. Studies show that this can lead to injuries and burnout. While baseball is no exception to the all-year mentality, encouraging your soccer playing child to go out for baseball offers variety. Time will tell if they gravitate towards one sport or the other (or neither). BACK

I played Little League as a kid. What is JBO? How is it different than Little League?

A: JBO stands for Junior Baseball Organization. It is a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide youth up to 14 , regardless of skill level, an opportunity to compete in baseball against other players of similar ability. The primary difference between JBO and Little League is that JBO plays amended high school rules. One of the most notable rule difference concerns lead offs and base stealing. In JBO a player may take a lead off and steal at any time during the pitch. In most traditional youth leagues (i.e., Little League), a player cannot lead off nor steal until the ball crosses home plate. Although at the midget level this leads to many stolen bases (pickoffs and get caught stealing are rare), at the higher levels the base stealing rule makes for some exciting baseball. Another difference is that a team is eligible for postseason play as a unit, no "all-star" team is created. Levels are determine up-front via a tryout system (link here) and then are kept together throughout the season and into the playoffs (if they qualify). Lastly, in JBO the field size grows as the kids grow, starting at age 9. The growth of the field helps to ensure pitching does not dominate as they kids get older. BACK

I am considering a local baseball club like Mound Time. How is Reedville different?

A: Mound Time, located in Hillsboro, in one of several local "club" teams that uses limited rosters in the interest of building highly competitive baseball teams. Players, not limited by local boundaries, try out for teams based on their age. Tryouts are very competitive and if you make a team you are expected to commit for the entire year, both in time and money. To be sure, you will see a lot of intense baseball practice, however there is no guarantee you will play as club teams only require 9 players in their lineup. By contrast, Reedville is part of Westside JBO and as such abides by rules that guarantee minimum playing time and inclusion within the batting order, while still playing within a competitive environment. In addition, Reedville, like other JBO teams, is a local organization, pulling kids that live within the Century High School district. This goes a long way in promoting community pride. If Mound Time (or the Yard, PBC, etc.) appeals to you feel free to contact them for more information. If you are unsure if a club team is right for you, perhaps attend one of their camps to get a feel for the club experience. BACK

Why is it called Reedville Baseball and not something like Century Youth Baseball?

A: The name "Reedville" is historical. The organization, which began at Reedville Elementary, has been in existence since 1949, long before Century High School. Over the past few years there has been discussion within the board of changing the name to the more "conventional" Century name to connect the name to the high school, however it was decided to continue to honor the historic name to reflect Reedville's long history with the community. BACK

Does Reedville Baseball offer off-season camps/workouts?

A: Yes! During the fall the Reedville Board determines the type of camp, where, and when, and then goes out and gauges interest. Previous winter camps have been held at Mound Time and Brown MS and are a relatively inexpensive way to get your kids some off season practice. Also Century High School offers a spring camp. Attendance is optional and in no way determines your eligibility to play at a given level, as that is determined at tryouts. NOTE: generally you must already be registered to play in the spring to be eligible for the camp. BACK

Are girls allowed to play baseball for Reedville?

A: Yes. Girls can play all the way through senior level. BACK

I live outside of the Century High School boundary. Can my child play for Reedville?

A: At the rec levels there are no boundary requirements. Nor is there a boundary requirement for Fall Ball (when offered). However, for the spring season at the JBO levels the answer is generally no. The policy of enforcing boundaries promotes community as well as eliminates the possibility parent "team shopping" (it happens) around to find the best fit and of coaches "recruiting" talent from outside of the boundary in the interest of creating an "all-star" type team, specifically when an organization uses a tryout process (like Reedville). Such practices are counter to the JBO philosophy. There are, however, exceptions. Most often this is done when a small number of players are needed to complete a team, and those players happen to be "extra" players from another organization. Individual boundary "waivers" are handled on a case by case basis and require at a minimum the approval of the league. Contact the president at president@reedvillebaseball.com for details. Also see the Waiver Process link for details. BACK

My child has a good friend who plays for Liberty. Can he/she play for Liberty?

A: See above. In this case you should seek a waiver from Reedville to play out of district, and Reedville will have the say on whether the waiver is approved. The policies for waivers to play out of district are defined by the JBO governing body, www.juniorbaseballorg.com, see JBO rule Book. Also refer to the Waiver Process for details. BACK

My daughter can't decide between baseball or softball. Which one should she play?

A: The games are similar in many ways but have obvious differences. It is really up to you. Some parents/kids like starting with baseball as the ball is smaller and is easier to throw and catch. Also the physical difference between boys and girls at a young age is small and as a result some of the best players on rec and even competitive level teams are girls. If she has an older brother who plays baseball and she want to play then by all means have her play baseball. If her friends all play softball and she wants to play softball let her play softball. As youths it is really about having fun and learning to love the game, whether it is softball or baseball. And, almost all of the skills she would learn in baseball translate easily to softball. BACK

OK, my child wants to play! How much is registration? Where do I go to register?

A: Great! Registration fees vary by level and will be published on the website as well as the flyer that will be sent to the schools. They range from $65 for pee-wee to $240 for seniors. Register at the website. BACK

I have completed the registration process. What is the next step?

A: Watch your email and check online on the Website or Facebook. Once you register and are confirmed you are automatically put on the email distribution list and will receive communications about teams, tryouts, camps, special events (like discount days at Dicks Sporting Goods), etc. Tryouts are typically in late February/early March with team formation ~1 week later. Rec level teams form in late-March after spring break. Once teams are formed the head coach will be your main source of communication. BACK

What do my registration fees go towards?

A: The biggest expenses incurred for Reedville Baseball are for field maintenance (Reedville contracts out a landscaping company), uniforms, equipment upkeep (stuff always breaks), insurance, umpires, larger maintenance projects, and tournaments. BACK

I just registered my child at the pee-wee/rookie level. What equipment do I need to buy and what is supplied? Where is a good place to buy gear?

A: Since the uniform is supplied, the main items you will want to have is a pair of baseball cleats, mitt, batting helmet, and bat. Also it might be a good idea to get your son used to wearing a protective cup if he intends to stay with baseball. If you are on a budget, gently used equipment can often be found at thrift stores or used sporting goods stores. Rec level teams also have community bats that your child can use. Another option is to take advantage of the annual "discount days" offered at local sporting goods stores (in the last several years this was at Dicks). Emails will be sent out for these events. Other good stores are Frye's in Forest Grove, and Big 5. The sky is the limit when it comes to gear, just know that the mind of a rec level player can change quickly so keep that in mind when your child is eyeing that shiny $300 bat. BACK

I am interested in coaching my child's team. Who shall I contact about coaching?

A: First, thank you for your interest! Feel free to contact the JBO director (for competitive levels) or the rec director (for pee-wee and rookie) and they will provide you guidance. You will have to submit to a background check for working with youth. Also there is typically a coaches' clinic offered in the spring before season start so it is good to get "on the list" as soon as you can. Thanks again! BACK

I never played as a youth so I do not feel qualified to coach. How else can I get involved?

A: Never fear, there are loads of opportunities! You should also note that just because you didn't play doesn't mean you cannot coach, particularly at the rec level. What kids need at the rec level are parents who are willing to get and keep kids engaged, in simple drills and the youth game. Also safety is paramount with dealing with 12 kids armed with baseball bats! In addition, throughout the season at all levels there are opportunities as team parent, scorekeeping, running the snack shack, etc. The possibilities are endless and it is a great way to get involved--no coaching experience necessary. BACK

Are the Reedville coaches required to submit a background check? Do they received any specialized (i.e., concussion) training?

A: A background check is required for all persons working with youth (this also includes the board). They also receive concussion recognition training. BACK

My third grader has never played baseball before and I heard there is a "tryout" process? Will he/she make a team? Should I even bother registering him/her?

A: Yes, Reedville employs a tryout process, typically in late February or early March. The purpose of tryouts is to match players with similar skill levels, both in the interest of competition and for safety. The purpose is not to cut players. See the Website under Competitive Baseball for more details. So, go ahead and register your third grader, he/she will end up on a team that may also have players that have never played. BACK

I have heard that baseball requires a significant amount of parent involvement. What involvement is expected?

A: Like any organized sport, it would not get off the ground without parent involvement. It is how community leagues such as Reedville are able to keep costs down while still offering a great baseball experience. Because of its complexity multiple baseball coaches per team are ideal, even at the youngest levels. A head coach may have 1-3 assistants, and the coach will greatly appreciate the division of labor and the close supervision needed at the rec level. In addition, teams need bookeepers, team parents (what would the games be without snacks!), and people to run the snack shack. Every spring you are also expected to dedicate a day to the time honored tradition of "Field Day". It's a lot of work but worth it! BACK

What is "Field Day?"

A: Field Day is a community event held in early to mid-April (weather permitting) where all parents and players come out to Ladd Acres, Brown, or Indian Hills to spend the day preparing the fields for the spring season. It is a great way to meet your new team and share in the hard work. The field directors and other board members will be there to direct the activities and bring some equipment, although in general it helps to bring your own gardening equipment. Expect to spend the day weeding, raking, scraping, picking up rocks, and helping to spread Turface. So, come March, watch your email and the Reedville Facebook site for details. Your new coach will also be providing assignments that will tell you where to go. The day typically starts at ~0900 and last about 5 hours. BACK

If part of our registration fees go towards field maintenance, why do we have a Field Day?

A: Most of the money for Field maintenance is geared towards ongoing within season and off season maintenance of the fields. However, the fields, just like our yards, take a beating over the winter. Come late March and early April, coinciding with season start, the weeds come back with a vengeance, and it really takes a group effort to clean it all up in time for the season to start. As stated previously, it is a great way to meet or reconnect with other parents and your teammates, and also promotes a sense of pride when it is all done. BACK

What is the Jamboree?

A: The Jamboree marks the annual (weather permitting) kick-off of the baseball season. Occurring after Field Day, it is a mini-round robin set of games between the rec teams and occurs on the rec fields at Ladd. The event is used to build community and get everyone ready for the year. Your coach will provide details. BACK

Is the uniform supplied?

A: Yes. If you have questions please contact the Uniform Coordinator. BACK

It's raining. How do I find out if the game is cancelled?

A: Typically your coach will contact you as soon as he/she knows. Game cancellation due to weather is tricky and the decision to cancel may not occur until just before game time. Just make sure your coach has accurate contact information and then check frequently before games if the weather is marginal. BACK

How are the rookie/pee-wee teams formed? When do I find out?

A: When the registration list is finalized after the deadline (in Mid-March), teams of 12 players are formed at random, however every effort is made to honor player and coach requests. The teams are then matched with coaches. The process of team formation is finalized ~7-10 days after the registration cutoff. Your assigned coach will then contact you to provide details on practices and other expectations. BACK

Roughly, when does the season start and when does it end?

A: The season varies depending on your level. In general, expect rec games to start soon after the Jamboree in late April and end in early June before school lets out. JBO games start in mid-April and can last well into July if you include post-season play. In addition, all JBO teams can expect to play in 1 or more tournaments during the season. See the Baseball Programs link for details. BACK

My child plays another sport in the spring. Can he/she still play baseball?

A: Yes. Playing another spring sport does not preclude you from playing baseball. However, note that at the competitive levels playing time in games often correlates with practice participation (and effort). Some youths playing multiple sports often miss practice to play in games for their second sport. So, while you can play multiple sports, this may affect playing time. It is recommended that you discuss this with your coach as soon as possible and work out something with him/her well ahead of season start. BACK

My child(ren) want(s) to play but the registration fees are too much given my income. Are scholarships available?

A: Yes! At Reedville we want to make sure that every child who wants to play is allowed that opportunity. Therefore a limited amount of money is budgeted every year for families to enable to help offset the registration cost with half or full scholarships. Please contact the Reedville admin at registrar@reedvillebaseball.com for a form or more details. BACK

thx, Bill Fitts, Reedville Web Director